Literatures, Cultures, and Languages

Department Head

Associate Professor Gustavo Nanclares

Professors

Aschkenasy, Berthelot, Celestin, DalMolin, Einbinder, Gomes, Loss, Miller, Shoulson, von Hammerstein, and Weidauer

Associate Professors

Balma, Caner, Casamayor-Cisneros, Diaz-Marcos, Finger, Irizarry, Johnson, Nanclares, Pardo, Saugera, Seda, Terni, Travis, Urios-Aparisi, Wagner, and Wogenstein

Assistant Professors

Celli, Hershenzon, Ladha, Meng, Yang

Affiliated Members

English Professors Breen, Coundouriotis, Higonnet, Hogan, Sanchez, Winter; Associate Professor Phillips

Department of Literatures, Cultures and Languages (LCL)

The Department of Literatures, Cultures and Languages offers the degrees of Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). The department offers courses of study leading to the Field of Study in Literatures, Cultures and Languages for both the Ph.D. and M.A, with areas of concentration in French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Italian Literary and Cultural Studies, Spanish Studies, and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies.

The M.A. Program

M.A. programs typically require two years of full-time study, and are offered in French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Italian Literary and Cultural Studies, Spanish Studies, Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, and Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies. The master’s degree in any of these fields may serve as the initial, two-year segment of Ph.D. study in the department, or as a terminal degree. The M.A. degree can also provide the academic foundation for teaching at the secondary or primary school levels.

Master’s degrees may be earned under either of two plans, as determined by the advisory committee. Either Plan A or Plan B may be used for completing the M.A. to enter the Ph.D. Plan A requires not fewer than fifteen credits of advanced course work and for students entering Fall 1998 or later, not fewer than nine additional credits of Master’s Thesis Research (GRAD 5950 or GRAD 5960), and the writing of a thesis. Plan B requires not fewer than twenty-four credits of advanced course work, a final examination, but no thesis. In either case, advisory committees may require more than the minimum number of credits.

Students following either M.A. plan must complete the required number of course credits —including a course in Literary Theory and in Foreign Language Teaching Methodology, as approved by the student’s committee. The Film Theory and History (LCL 5010) course may substitute for the Introduction to Literary Theory course (CLCS 5302) with the permission of the student’s advisory committee. Students who seek state teaching certification should elect the Teaching Methodology course, and consult with the NEAG School of Education concerning other inclusions; further courses in Education are ordinarily required.

Admission to the M.A. and Ph.D. Programs

Prospective applications for admission to M.A. or Ph.D. study, together with letters of recommendation, a personal statement, and a critical and analytical original paper should reach Storrs by January 15 to be competitive for assistantships and fellowships for the Fall semester. Applications at other times may be considered for funding. There is no separate application for teaching assistantships. Admission is competitive, and qualifying graduate students are financially supported as teaching or research assistants.

The Ph.D. in Literatures, Cultures and Languages

The department offers a program of Ph.D. study that permits concentration in one of five primary fields: French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Italian Literary and Cultural Studies, Spanish Studies, or Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies. Such Ph.D. study also permits, with approval, the incorporation of one of the following secondary departmental fields of study: Applied Linguistics, Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Digital Culture and Media Studies, or History and Theory of World Cinema; or a secondary field devised in collaboration with another university department or program such as Medieval Studies, Human Rights, Women’s Studies and Judaic Studies.

The department prepares Ph.D. students to engage in the interdisciplinary study of literatures, cultures and languages by integrating various regional cultures, historical periods, and methodologies essential to literary and cultural scholarship. The areas of research of the department’s faculty are complementary and interconnected in a broad range of research fields and allow for a design that simultaneously focuses on particular literatures, cultures and languages and interdisciplinary areas of study in the context of emerging global communities.

Formal acceptance into the Ph.D. program ordinarily assumes completion of M.A. requirements in this department or the achievement elsewhere of qualifications judged appropriate by the Ph.D. admissions committee. Students with an earned master’s degree in a relevant field, or making substantial progress toward such a degree, and whose graduate record shows sufficient promise in analytical work, may apply for admission to the doctoral program.

Students in the Ph.D. program must complete, in one of the five primary fields listed below, at least 12 credits of graduate coursework, and at least six credits in a secondary field defined and approved by the candidate’s advisory committee. Some requirements may be completed in the M.A. program. The secondary field should be formally identified early in the course of study. It can consist of one of the department’s areas of expertise summarized below or another field approved in collaboration with another university department or program. Every plan of study is individually structured and monitored by a committee chosen by the student in consultation with his or her main advisor.

Further details on requirements for a specific field of specialization can be found in the Graduate Handbook of the Department of Literatures, Cultures and Languages, which can be obtained from the Graduate Catalog and other publications of the Graduate School. Additional information about the department is available on the departmental website: http://languages.uconn.edu/.

Primary Fields of Departmental Scholarly Expertise

These permit the development of graduate-level research programs that reflect substantial departmental groupings of both course offerings and faculty expertise and research interest in a variety of constituent areas.

French and Francophone Studies engages the diversity of French literary and cultural production from a multiplicity of viewpoints: from France to former French colonies in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean; in the Muslim world from Senegal to Syria; and in Asia and the Americas, from Vietnam to Quebec. Seminars in the Department’s core strengths – including Medieval Studies, Digital Culture & Media Studies, and Film – are central to the French and Francophone Studies Program, which stresses interdisciplinary, intercultural, and transnational approaches. Seminars in specialized topics include medieval literature, culture and languages; animal and environmental studies; fantasy and science fiction studies; poetry and philosophy; social and literary theory; postcolonial literatures, cultures and theories; literature and media; urban, material and consumer cultures; and contact linguistics. The faculty also supports a rigorous language and pedagogy program, which may lead to certification for secondary school teaching.

German Studies offers seminars in German literature, culture, and linguistics leading to the Ph.D. degree. Interdisciplinary studies in Comparative Literature, Linguistics, Women’s Studies (WS Certificate), and Human Rights (HR Certificate), among others, are available in cooperation with other sections and departments. The graduate program strongly supports an interdisciplinary, intercultural, and transnational approach to German Literary and Cultural Studies, including trans-disciplinary literary and cultural theory, “interkulturelle Germanistik,” applied linguistics, literature and other arts, and anthropological, historical and philosophical inquiries into literary studies, beginning with the 18th century. Additional expertise: Black-German Studies, Gender Studies, Film and Media Studies, German-Jewish Studies, Literature/Culture and Philosophy, and Interarts Studies.

Italian Literary and Cultural Studies offers graduate courses in all periods from the Middle Ages and Renaissance to the present.  Their interdisciplinary, intercultural, and transnational approach encompasses the Italian Diaspora to the Americas, Mediterranean Studies, Ethnic and Gender Studies, and Film and Media Studies.  Students are strongly encouraged to draw upon the resources associated with the Emiliana Pasca Noether Chair for Modern Italian History and interdisciplinary programs such as Medieval Studies, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies and the program in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies.

Spanish Studies offers graduate courses in Latin American, Peninsular and Latino literature, culture, film, and linguistics leading to the Ph.D. degree. The research program in Spanish includes Spanish Literary and Cultural Studies, Golden Age, Colonial, 18th-21st-century Peninsular, 19th-21st -century Latin American Studies, Latino Studies in U.S. and Caribbean Literary and Cultural Studies, and a diversity of theoretical fields such as Gender Studies, Film and Media Studies, Performance Studies and Applied Linguistics.

Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies

The graduate program offers students the opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary, transcultural study of literatures and the arts. Students design their own plan of study in consultation with a group of faculty from the program and/or other academic departments. Ph.D. candidates are expected to pursue studies in three different fields and demonstrate advanced proficiency in at least two languages in addition to English.

Secondary Fields:

Applied Linguistics

Areas of pedagogical, interpretative and quantitative approaches to language, literature, media and cultural studies. Among others, the specialty areas are Second Language Acquisition; Applied Cognitive Linguistics; Humor studies; Language Contact; Bilingualism; Language Acquisition; Pragmatics and Semiotics.

Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies (an independent program for M.A. study)

This specialization provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to study and teach the languages and cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean. Areas of faculty specialization include the Greek, Hellenistic and Roman worlds, Second Temple and Rabbinic Judaism, and the world of Late Antiquity.

Digital Culture and Media Studies

The secondary concentration in Digital Culture and Media Studies prepares students to work in a wide variety of interdisciplinary fields such as Game Studies and Media Philosophy and to undertake research projects in Media History. The application of media theory and history to the burgeoning digital culture presents a unique opportunity to merge practice with theory and to pursue work in the humanities with a scope that extends from the classical world through our immediate contexts. Ultimately, students learn to participate as scholars and teachers in the discourses springing from the integration of digital computer technology and multiple media into world culture.

Hebrew and Judaic Studies (an independent program for M.A. study)

This newly configured section of the department brings together faculty who are engaged in the teaching of Hebrew and Judaic Studies full-time as well as members of other sections who have teaching or research interests pertaining to the history, literature, languages, and cultures of the Jews. (See: Hebrew and Judaic Studies Section, Faculty).
The highly interdisciplinary graduate offerings of this section focus on historiographic, literary, and cultural issues that intersect with other literatures and cultures taught in the department, enabling graduate students pursuing a Ph.D. in LCL to develop a concentration or focus in a Judaic related area, especially regarding the Jewish experience in the Greco-Roman/Late Antique, Medieval, and Early Modern periods. (see: http://judaicstudies.uconn.edu/students/graduate-studies/).

History and Theory of World Cinema

This specialization provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to study and teach world cinema through film history and theory in an interdisciplinary context. The analysis of film form and aesthetics as well as a cultural, economic and political phenomenon is this secondary field’s objective.

Other secondary areas may be designed in consultation with programs outside the department such as Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, Human Rights, and Medieval Studies. Students may design additional secondary fields in consultation with their Ph.D. committee. Other secondary areas may include: World Cinema, Digital Culture and Media Studies and others to be designed in consultation with programs outside the department such as, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, Human Rights, Judaic Studies, Medieval Studies. Students may design additional secondary fields in consultation with their advisor and Ph.D. committee.

Courses
Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies
French and Francophone Studies
German Studies
Italian Literary and Cultural Studies
Literatures Cultures and Languages
Spanish Studies

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