Statistics

Department Head

Professor Joseph Glaz

Distinguished Professor

Dipak Dey

Professors

M.-H. Chen, Chi, Glaz, Harel, Kuo, Mukhopadhyay, Pozdnyakov, Ravishanker, Vitale and Yan

Associate Professors

Majumdar

Assistant Professors

Bar, K. Chen, Schifano, Wang and Zhang

Adjunct Associate Professor

Cappelleri and Ting

Biostatistics

The professional MS program in biostatistics focuses on practical skills that are sought after in health related fields, including pharmaceutical sciences and genomics. The objective of the program is to provide rigorous training in the modern areas of biostatistics related to the theory and application of statistical science to solve problems in public health, health services, health policy, and biomedical research, and other areas such as environmental health and ecology. Students completing this program successfully will acquire expertise in topics including statistical inference, linear regression, analysis of variance, design and analysis of clinical trials and epidemiological studies, programming in SAS and R, and consulting.

Individuals with a Bachelor’s degree in any major, with a background in mathematics and statistics are encouraged to apply. The program requires 31 credits and passing a written qualifying exam on both theoretical and applied aspects of biostatistics. Qualified full time students are expected to complete this program in three to four semesters.

There are no official course requirements for admission to graduate study in the department, but a degree of mathematical facility is necessary for acceptable progress through the program.

The Department of Statistics provides extensive computational facilities for statistical study and research. The Homer Babbidge Library provides excellent coverage of current and past issues of statistics journals as well as books in this field. As part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Department of Statistics is house in the Philip E. Austin Building.

Statistics

The Department of Statistics offers work leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, as well as courses in applied statistics in support of graduate programs in other fields. The M.S. program combines training in both statistical application and theory. To broaden their view of the use of statistics, candidates for the master’s degree are required to enroll in at least one course involving the application of statistics offered by any other department on campus except Computer Science and Mathematics. In addition, students are encouraged to become involved in the statistical consultation work done by members of the department.

The doctoral program also provides a balance between statistical methods and theory. It emphasizes the development of the ability to create new results in statistical methods, statistical theory, or probability. After completing the necessary course work and a sequence of comprehensive written and oral examinations, the Ph.D. student must write a dissertation representing an original contribution to the field of statistics or probability. It is possible for the dissertation to be predominantly a development of statistical methodology in new areas of application. Both the M.S. and Ph.D. programs allow students sufficient flexibility to pursue their interests and to provide the time to take courses offered by other departments.

There are no official course requirements for admission to graduate study in the department, but a degree of mathematical facility is necessary for acceptable progress through the program.

The Department of Statistics provides extensive computational facilities for statistical study and research. The Homer Babbidge Library provides excellent coverage of current and past issues of statistics journals as well as books in this field. As part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Department of Statistics is house in the Philip E. Austin Building.

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