Social Work Elective (SWEL)

5310. Services to Immigrants and Refugees and Cross-Culture Helping

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Examines and connects concepts from migration studies with social work practice knowledge. Highlights the influence of immigration policy and procedures on the lives of immigrants and on service delivery and social work practice. Examines the interrelationship between sending and receiving countries and examines the experiences of individuals in the home country with their experiences in the new country. Emphasizes cultural and cross-cultural issues in each of the migration stages. Highlights different cultural views on health, mental health, help-seeking behavior, family and child-rearing practices and gender role behavior. Elective course for Substantive Area: ocused Area of Study on International Issues in Social Work.

5317. Women, Children, and Families: Social Policies and Programs

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Focuses on the policies and programs that affect women and children, in particular income supports, maternal and child health, housing, domestic violence, foster care and adoption, and parenting and child maltreatment. Special attention will be paid to the legal rights of women and children, especially those who are immigrants, have disabilities, or are members of minority groups. Required course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on Social Work with Women and Children in Families.

5318. Core Concepts of Child and Adolescent Trauma

Three credits.

Incorporates the new National Child Traumatic Stress Network core curriculum on child trauma (CCCT). The course conveys the crucial evidence-based concepts, components, and skills designed by the NCTSN to strengthen competency in assessment, referral, and treatment.

5321. Social Work Perspectives on Adoption

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Focuses on new developments in adoption and the knowledge, values and skills needed by social workers to effectively plan and deliver adoption services to a diverse group of children and families. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on Social Work with Women and Children in Families.

5333. Travel Study for Social Work

Variable (1-3) credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program; instructor consent required.

Combines academic study with travel to examine social work and social welfare in other systems. Addresses the impact of social, economic and political systems on social welfare and social work; a cross-national examination of the profession; and cross-cultural understanding. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on Puerto Rican/Latino/a Studies Social Work; Elective course for Substantive Area: ocused Area of Study on International Issues in Social Work.

5345. International Development: Theory and Practice

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

International relief, reconstruction and development — theories and practice strategies to attack poverty and improve human well-being. Among the topics covered will be: building local capacity, developing local partnerships, use of appropriate technology to create sustainability, multi-sectoral work, cultural relevance, ensuring gender sensitive programming, understanding and working with local and national structures, funding streams, and international partnerships. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on International Social Work.

5348. International Social Work Global Issues

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Cross-national, comparative approach to selected topics in international social problems and social welfare. Consideration of the problem of developing nations and modernization and urbanization as worldwide processes; the role of international organizations; the role of social work in international issues; and the implications of cross-national study for practice. Required course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on International Issues in Social Work; Elective course for Substantive Area: ocused Area of Study on Urban Issues in Social Work.

5350. Comparative Social Welfare Policy between the U.S. and the Second World

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Evolution and current state of development of social welfare in the “Second World,” a designation that applies to those countries that were part of the Soviet Union or Warsaw Pact. Discussion of a framework for policy analysis and comparative international social welfare policy analysis using selected health, welfare and employment policies as illustrations of current social welfare policy in Armenia and other “Second World” countries. Course will be jointly taught by Dr. Nancy A. Humphreys and Dr. Ludmilla Haroutunian involving a group of UConn M.S.W. students and Armenian graduate students using WebCT technology. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study in International Social Work.

5351. Policy Issues in Aging

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

History, development, and ramifications of social, economic and political policy issues relevant to the elderly; the elderly as voters and political actors. Major attention to framework for policy analysis. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on Social Work Practice with Older Adults.

5360. Economic Justice: Labor and Social Work

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

The relationship of social work and the labor movement with particular attention to the labor movement under new leadership and with new direction. Organized around four themes: 1) Common roots of labor and social work, 2) Social workers as union members, 3) Social workers as union organizers and 4) The labor movement as a social movement.

5371. Permanent Families for Children

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Permanency planning as a framework for social work practice in child welfare. Examines the philosophy, theory, and methodology of permanency planning for children and youth placed, or at risk of placement, out of their homes. Programs, skills, and strategies for preventing placement, reuniting placed children with their biological families, or developing other permanent families, particularly through adoption. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on Social Work with Women and Children in Families.

5375. War, Militarism and Social Work

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Theoretical and empirical content on several linked global phenomenon — imperialism, militarism, and war — to understand their impact on U.S. and global society. Analysis of “globalization,” its relationship to war and militarism, and why this process is relevant to social work practice. Political forces in the United States that support and benefit from militarism to illustrate their effects on social policy and the social work profession. Arguments for and against a dominant and aggressive U.S. role in global affairs will be examined. The adverse impact upon the welfare state and oppressed populations.

5377. Urban Policy Issues

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Urban problems and policy issues as well as social work practice issues in urban settings. Connecticut cities are used to explore the effectiveness of current policies and consider the need for policy change. Current social and economic needs of urban populations and the political environment are also considered. Required course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on Urban Issues in Social Work; Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on International Issues in Social Work.

5380. Political Social Work

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program. May be repeated once for credit.

Exploration of the world of elected politics as a legitimate field of social work practice. Social workers are currently playing many roles in this area including, serving as volunteer and paid staff in political campaigns at the local, state and federal level; as paid staff of elected politicians; in politically appointed positions; and as elected politicians. Practical realities of each of these positions. Students are required to attend the annual Campaign School sponsored by the Institute for the Advancement of Political Social Work Practice. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on Urban Issues in Social Work.

5385. Human Rights and Social Work

Three credits. Prerequisite: open only to students in the M.S.W. or STEP program.

Theoretical, conceptual, and practical foundation for social workers to engage in a human rights-based approach to social work. Students will gain an understanding of the international human rights system, social work’s contribution to achieving human rights, and how international human rights principles can be applied to social work practice. We will use a number of cases from varied countries, including the United States, to examine how social workers can both advocate for and respect human rights in their work.

5386. Transitioning Youth at Risk

Variable (1-3) credits.

Designed to be taken concurrently with the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DHMAS) field placement internship. It is a requirement for the DHMAS cohort, and is limited to this designated group. It is a two semester seminar, which meets on an every other week basis. Students will receive a grade at the end of each semester. Provides an overview and critical analysis of theories of young adult development, the recovery model as it is practiced in Connecticut, the impact of major mental illness on psychosocial functioning in the community, and effective social work interventions.