Pathobiology

The Department of Pathobiology offers two graduate degrees: Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Pathobiology, with areas of concentrations in Bacteriology, Virology, and Pathology, as well as an M.S. degree in Pathobiology with an area of concentration in Veterinary Anatomic Pathology. Faculty research focuses on infectious diseases of animals and humans, vaccines, veterinary pathology, and wildlife diseases. Many faculty are members of the Center of Excellence for Vaccine Research (CEVR), which provides a unifying consortium for vaccine research at the University of Connecticut. The department also provides service to the University and citizens of the State of Connecticut through integration with the Connecticut Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory. The Veterinary Anatomic Pathology M.S. program is open only to students with the D.V.M/V.M.D. degree.

Master of Science

For the areas of concentration in Bacteriology, Pathology, and Virology, students can follow either Plan A (thesis) or Plan B (non-thesis) options. For the Plan A, Master of Science degree, 21 credits of coursework and nine credits of GRAD 5950 or 5960 are required. For the Plan B, Master of Science degree, 30 credits of coursework followed by a comprehensive exam are required. All courses used to meet the degree and concentration requirements must be approved by the student’s major advisor. For the M.S. degree with an area of concentration in veterinary anatomic pathology, students must take the following courses: PVS 5300, 5303, 5392, 5394, and 5594.

Doctor of Philosophy

For all areas of concentration, a total of 30 credits of coursework are required. All courses used to meet the degree and concentration requirements must be approved by the student’s major advisor. The Ph.D. in Pathobiology does not have a related area or foreign language requirement. In addition, students will give at least three seminar presentations during their tenure (prospectus seminar, near midpoint of their research and dissertation defense). The General Exam should be taken within one semester after completing course work. A Dissertation Proposal is to be written in the form of an NIH grant proposal and presented in the form of a seminar. This is to be completed within six months of passing the general exam. Students must at a minimum have one first author publication before completion of their degree. The student must present at research seminars once per year.

The programs are offered by the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources.