Graduate Course Descriptions

The following directory lists the graduate courses which the University expects to offer, although the University in no way guarantees that all such courses will be offered in any given academic year, and reserves the right to alter the list if conditions warrant. Click on the links below for a list of courses in that subject area. You may then click “View Classes” to see scheduled classes for individual courses.

6400. Social Work Doctoral Program Independent Study

3.00 credits | May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Prerequisites: Open only to Social Work Doctoral Program students (RG 3743).

Grading Basis: Graded

Special Social Work topics not included in the Social Work Doctoral Program curriculum may be the subject of an Independent Study. A proposal must be presented and approved by the Student's advisor and Doctoral Director.

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6410. Research l: Research Design and Knowledge Generation

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission.

Grading Basis: Graded

Logic and methods of scientific inquiry in the social sciences, with specific emphasis on issues relevant to social work research and practice. Philosophical assumptions, historical and cultural contexts, and ethical dilemmas that drive and inform the selection, structure and application of alternative research designs. Experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental design options will be considered. Inductive and deductive processes, hypothesis testing, probability and sampling, and analytic procedures appropriate to the different design options will be examined. Attention to using research to promote human rights and social justice will be explored.

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6411. Research II: Survey Research Methods

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: SSW 6410; Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission (RG 5724)

Grading Basis: Graded

Builds upon the foundation laid by SSW 6410; particularly by looking at the ways that survey design and survey data collection support the development of quasi-experimental research designs. Provides the skills necessary to conduct self-administered surveys to meet the goals of social work practice and research. Surveys as tools for assessing needs, monitoring program activities, measuring outcomes, and assessing attitudes. Students will learn about automated software tools for survey construction such as Qualtrics and Survey Monkey. In-depth exploration of the techniques of program evaluation and explores the role of survey research in program evaluation design and implementation.

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6412. Research III: Multivariate Statistics I

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Prerequisite or Corequisite: SSW 6410. Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission (RG5725)

Grading Basis: Graded

Builds upon an introductory level of statistical knowledge and assumes that you have completed an introductory statistics course, including experiences with data analyses that involve computer interactions (SPSS). Develops an understanding of the general linear model (GLM). Once students gain a solid understanding of GLM, students can extend their knowledge to a variety of more complex statistical tests. Selection and application of appropriate statistical procedures to answer research questions or test hypotheses in social work research, and involves the extensive use of available statistical packages. While the course emphasizes the understanding of statistical testing, interpretation and written presentation of statistical results, knowledge of the mathematical formulae and assumptions underlying each statistical procedure may be required and are discussed in class. Equivalent courses offered by other UConn schools may be substituted with advisor approval.

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6413. Research IV: Multivariate Statistics II

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: SSW 6412; Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission (RG 5726)

Grading Basis: Graded

Building upon SSW 6412, focuses on the selection and application of appropriate statistical procedures to answer research questions or test hypotheses in social work research. Data reduction methods and analyses of discrete or categorical data and involves the extensive use of available statistical packages. While the course emphasizes the understanding of statistical testing, interpretation and written presentation of statistical results, knowledge of the mathematical formulae and assumptions underlying each statistical procedure may be required, and these are discussed in class. Equivalent courses offered by other UConn schools may be substituted with advisor approval.

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6414. Research V: Qualitative Research Methods

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: SSW 6410; Prerequisite or Co-requisite: SSW 6411. Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission. (RG 5727)

Grading Basis: Graded

Philosophical underpinnings, history, techniques and relevance to social work research of qualitative inquiry traditions such as biography, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography and case study methods. Although many of these techniques are also useful in social work practice, this course will focus on the use of qualitative methods for the purpose of expansion of the knowledge base of the profession. As such the course will emphasize techniques, standards of quality, verification, and other indicators of rigor as well as value an ethical issues. After completing this course students will be able to describe various approaches, set up research protocols, utilize qualitative data analysis software (e.g. NVivo), describe quality control techniques and specify standards for report writing.

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6415. Topics in Advanced Social Work Research

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: SSW 6410; open only to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission.

Grading Basis: Graded

Advanced content on variable topics in social work research. Offers advanced conceptual understanding of skills used in complex research design, measurement, and or/analysis. Topics may include mixed methods research, advanced translational research, advanced quantitative analysis, advanced qualitative analysis, or other specialized research methods critical to the field of social work.

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6420. Critical Analysis of Historical and Philosophical Themes of the Profession

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission.

Grading Basis: Graded

Develops critical and historical understanding of social work knowledge, values and interventions. Social, economic, political and intellectual forces that influence the development of social welfare and professional social work. The role that conflicting ideologies and commitments in alleviating stress and suffering. Development and history of social work in the context of changing social, economic, political and intellectual environments.

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6425. Social Welfare Policy Seminar

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission.

Grading Basis: Graded

Focuses on the concepts, methods, and practices of analysis of social welfare policies designed to address social problems in the United States. Students are expected to apply social science research training and critical thinking skills to study the ideological and socioeconomic contextual backgrounds of social problems, social policies, and policy analyses and evaluate various alternatives to problem definitions, policy strategies, and types of policy analysis. The seminar aims to help students develop advanced skills in analyzing and critiquing social welfare policies and programs, making recommendations for change, and effectively communicating the results of their work.

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6435. Social and Behavioral Science: Knowledge Base for Social Work Practice with Smaller Target Systems

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission.

Grading Basis: Graded

Helps students understand the theoretical and empirical frameworks about human behavior and the social environment upon which contemporary best practices are built. The theories and frameworks examined include cognitive, behavioral/social learning, psychodynamic, family systems and other related concepts. Explores the major, past and present, social casework and group work practice models from historical, theoretical and empirical perspectives. Current practice approaches/models from related fields empirically shown to be most effective or promising are examined.

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6445. Social and Behavioral Science: Knowledge Base for Practice with Large Target Systems

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission.

Grading Basis: Graded

Provides substantive knowledge from social science disciplines that inform macro practice with large systems and fields of macro practice (community organization, administration and policy practice). It is expected that students demonstrate competence in understanding the development and application of major social science theoretical models relevant to macro practice and with the empirical evidence that supports these theories. Ethical implications for social work of knowledge developed by disciplines with different value bases are considered. Explores the evolution and development of macro practice in the United States with an emphasis on the use of methods of community organization and policy practice in social work. These distinct methods, as well as different practice models associated with them, will be considered in the context of the social work profession and practice.

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6451. Dissertation Preparation Seminar

3.00 credits

Prerequisites: Open to doctoral students in Social Work, others with permission.

Grading Basis: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

The Dissertation Seminar is designed to assist students in identifying suitable dissertation topics and developing appropriate methodological approaches. The seminar provides opportunities to assist students in building a firm foundation upon which to engage in independent research and scholarship to advance existing knowledge. Students are required to prepare papers related to their dissertation topic for presentation and discussion with the doctoral student group. Outside speakers from the UConn community are brought in to engage students on issues related to library resources, report writing, research funding support, data analysis, and the institutional review board process. The seminar will develop and strengthen students? scientific communication skills in preparation for the initiation of their dissertation proposal. Students taking this course receive a grade of Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

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